Your Next Doctor’s Visit Might Be Through Your iPhone

  

Via Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/dandiamond/2015/05/04/the-uber-for-doctors-is-here-and-it-isnt-what-you-think/ Are you ready to visit your doctor … by iPhone? American Well is banking on it. You may not recognize the name, but the company is a key player in telemedicine: American Well provides telehealth kiosks and software to most of the nation’s health plans, leading hospitals like Cleveland Clinic, and major employers like Oracle.
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What Will Come First: The Sharing Or Circular Economy?

  

Should economies be “sharing” or “circular?” The first term describes how the distributive power of the internet is helping people to rent and sell assets and abilities that that were previously virtually unmarketable. The second, meanwhile, is the end goal of what used to be called closed loop recycling – genuinely enabling the renewal of existing resources, rather than continuing to need to mine for new ones. Are these passing trends or new, sustainable ways of operating? And which has the earliest chance of becoming reality?

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Can Uber and Airbnb boost lower-income consumers? A new study says so

  

Startups like Uber and Airbnb, which form the core of the new “sharing economy,” can have a particularly positive effect on people with lower incomes, according to a new report. The study, from New York University professor Arun Sundararajan and research scientist Samuel Fraiberger, analyzed data from two years of transactions provided by Getaround, a peer-to-peer car rental startup. While consumers across various income levels saw a positive impact, people who made less money experience a particularly big boost, the study found.

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Guess who benefits most from the new ‘sharing’ economy?

  

Uber is an agency for freelance minicab drivers. Its technology allows anyone with a licence to make money from driving people around. AirBnB allows anyone with a home to make money from letting people sleep in it. In both cases, the founders have got rich by providing ordinary people with opportunities to make money — and then taking a cut. These businesses operate in an increasingly freelance society.

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Starwood, Uber partner to let you earn points per ride

  

Starwood Hotels and Resorts wants to take you for a ride. The global hotel chain has partnered with ride-hailing app Uber to make it easier for hotel guests to get around—and get rewarded for it. Starting today, Starwood Preferred Guest members will be able to earn loyalty program points by riding with Uber. But first, they have to link their SPG and Uber accounts at spg.com/uber and complete one qualifying stay in the calendar year at any Starwood property worldwide.

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We’ve just reached the logical extreme of the “Uber for X” economy

  

Three days ago Mike Chen decided to take a brief break and work with his teammates on a “side project” he hoped would make the life of a busy entrepreneur like himself just a little bit easier. Why not offer a very rudimentary on-demand service that lets you quickly request whatever you need — however random it might sound — via text message. Pizza delivery? Easy. A new bicycle? Why not. A new pet? If it’s legal. “This is something that I’ve always wanted to create to make my life easier,” Chen says. “I always wished I could text what I wanted.” He called it Magic. Because wouldn’t it be magic if it actually worked out?

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Sharing Is Declaring: How the Peer-to-Peer Economy Affects Your Taxes

  

While the concept of shared consumerism can have environmental and financial benefits, the issue of taxes – who pays, who owes and how they’re declared – has proved challenging to the companies at the heart of the sharing economy, and occasionally baffling to the people who use its services. To get a sense of the nuances of participating in the sharing economy, look at Zipcar and Lyft. Zipcar, now owned by Avis, is the sharing-economy equivalent of renting a car, while Lyft, which often competes with Uber, is the equivalent of hiring a taxi. Both have different tax implications.

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The Future Of The Sharing Economy Depends On Trust

  

According to Pew Research, only 19% of Millennials believe most people can be trusted, while 31% of GenX’ers do. If the future is a peer-to-peer marketplace, it will require increasingly reliable, innovative ways to identify those peers. Making sure this emerging economy has high standards and strong values will allow it to continue to expand. Sharing economy companies are beginning to understand the importance of that trust.

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